Baron & Budd has successfully represented people with asbestos diseases, including mesothelioma, and their families for more than 35 years. The cases described below report the net amounts of the verdicts or settlements our clients received in-pocket. These cases were all handled by Baron & Budd mesothelioma lawyers and were not referred to other law firms.

The following lawsuit amounts are only a sample and do not represent an exhaustive list of the firm’s mesothelioma litigation experience. The below cases represent a collection of secondhand, industrial, construction and military asbestos exposure.

Our national track record is virtually unmatched.

$10,603,661 million for a man who used asbestos-containing joint compound.

$6,356,942 million for the widow of a man who served in the Navy aboard nuclear submarines during the 1960s.

$4,380,755 million for an ironworker who worked at a number of industrial sites.

$3,665,24 million for the widow of a man who worked as an engineer at a power plant.

$3,665,248 million for a man who worked as a latherer/plasterer with an asbestos-containing joint compound product.

$3,625,231 million for an aircraft mechanic who worked with an asbestos-containing pipe covering product.

$3,122,080 million to the family of a man who worked as a mechanical contractor on various construction sites.

$2,828,514 million for a family of a man who worked as a welder and as a machinist.

$2,754,598 million for a man who was exposed to asbestos at a young age as a construction worker.

$2,421,607 million to the widow of a man who spent his career laying water and sewer lines.

$2,367,594 million to a man who was exposed to asbestos as a roofer and a tradesman at an oil company.

$2,298,832 million to the family of a man who worked as a millwright at numerous industrial sites.

$2,263,366 million for a man who worked in carpentry and construction.

$2,265,656 million for a man who was exposed to asbestos while working as a machinist and operator at an oil refinery.

$2,261,427 million for a man who was exposed while serving in the engine rooms of Navy ships.

$2,378,142 million for the widow of a man who was exposed, as a child, through his father’s work clothing in the family home.

$2,158,840 million for a man who worked as a career insulator at an oil refinery.

$2,117,719 million to the family of a man who was exposed to asbestos while working as a laborer at a chemical plant.

$2,070,662 million for a woman who was exposed to asbestos from the clothing of her father who worked as a construction worker.

$2,004,682 million for a man that worked as a custodian and used asbestos products during the construction and remodeling of school buildings.

$1,975,087 million for a man who worked as a custodian at an oil refinery.

$1,960,941 million for a man who was exposed to asbestos while working as a tradesman at an aluminum plant.

$1,905,005 million to a man who worked as a career electrician/journeyman.

$1,889,416 million for a man who worked as a carpenter at a munitions plant.

$1,857,890 million for a man who worked as a career construction worker on various industrial and commercial construction projects.

$1,876,786 million for a woman who was exposed to asbestos from handling her construction contractor husband’s clothes.

$1,811,800 million for a man who worked as a boiler tender aboard Navy ships and later worked as an auto mechanic.

$1,746,727 million for a man who worked as a roofer, carpenter and drywall installer for residential construction projects.

$1,730,599 million for the family of a woman who was exposed to asbestos as a child through her father’s work clothes.

$1,700,365 million for a man who was exposed to asbestos while working at a petrochemical plant.

$1,689,084 million for a man who worked as a pipefitter and plumber.

$1,683,959 million for a man who worked as a career construction worker.

$1,655,269 million for the family of a man who worked as a steelworker.

$1,639,861 million for a woman who was exposed to asbestos as a child and as an adult through her father’s and husband’s work clothes.

$1,637,308 million for a man who was exposed to asbestos while working as a tradesman at several industrial facilities.

$1,616,379 million for a man who worked as an insulator at a shipyard.

$1,581,167 million for a man who worked as an engineer.

$1,573,492 million for a woman who was exposed to asbestos from her father, a shipyard worker, and her husband, an oil refinery worker.

$1,565,553 million for a man who worked as a construction worker.

$1,564,497 million for a man who worked as a machinist.

$1,547,950 million for a woman who was exposed to asbestos while handling her husband’s work clothes.

$1,552,840 million for a man who worked at a paper mill.

$1,461,628 million for a man who worked as an insulator and sheetrock worker.

$1,451,520 million for a man who was exposed to asbestos as a railroad worker and custodian.

$1,442,225 million for a man who worked as a career machinist.

$1,394,921 million for a woman who was exposed to asbestos while handling the work clothes of her husband who was a construction worker.

$1,346,991 million for a man who worked as a boil operator in the Navy, and later, at schools and hospitals.

$1,246,006 million for a woman who was exposed to asbestos as a child from her father’s work clothing.

$1,245,191 million for a man who was exposed to asbestos while serving in the Navy.

$1,205,399 million for a man who was a ship engineer for an oil company while serving in the Navy.